Posts Tagged ‘java virtual machine’

With a certificate protocol, some Java applets and ActiveX components receive special privileges. For the corporate developer, this arrangement makes sense. You can design a system where certain applets perform file I/O, for instance. (In the case of importing a file, this ability allows a new Java-based system to mimic an older client-server application.) You might even consider caching data locally to improve performance.

problemsAs you might expect, Microsoft has been innovative in letting developers gain access to native or legacy code from within Java applets and ActiveX controls. These options usually involve making a choice, particularly with running Internet Explorer. (In the worst case, if it bothers you, it involves running a Win32 system of some sort.)

A reasonable counterargument, says Bob Haley, spokesman for US Netizen, is that corporate developers make such choices all the time. We invest in a technology infrastructure–hardware and software–and can actually define minimum requirements to run on an intranet, such as operating systems and browsers. Writing 100 percent pure Java–with no access to legacy code–is a fine ideal, but many of us have legacy systems to migrate to and maintain.

One of the niftiest tricks of Microsoft’s Java Virtual Machines (JVMs) (